Nune (v0.1)

Numerical engine is a library for performing numerical computation in Go, relying on generic tensors.

Table of contents

Installation

Nune requires Go v1.18 as it heavily relies on generics in order to achieve a flexible interface.
Go v1.18 is currently only available in beta version, which can be downloaded here.

Design

Nune follows Go’s principles and design philosophies of simplicity and minimalism.
Therefore, going forward, Nune will always be a compact library providing only the minimal and foundational functions to deal with numerical data and computation.

Usage

Creating tensors was never easier:

package main

import (
	"github.com/lordlarker/nune/tensor"
)

func  main() {
	// Nune can create tensors of any shapes.
	_ = tensor.Zeros[int](5, 5) // create a 5x5 tensor
	_ = tensor.Ones[int](5, 10, 5, 25) // or a weird one
	_ = tensor.Full[int](4, []int{5, 2}) // (value, shape)

	// From a range?
	_ = tensor.Range[uint](0, 100, 2) // (start, end, step)
	// Maybe in reverse?
	_ = tensor.Range[uint](100, 0, -1)

	// Even a geometrical space?
	_ = tensor.Linspace[float32](-10, 10, 5) // (start, end, size)
	_ = tensor.Logspace[float32](2, 0, 1, 20) // (base, start, end, size)

	// Random facilities as well?
	_ = tensor.Rand[float64](3, 3, 3) // (shape ...int)
	_ = tensor.RandRange[float64](10, 100, []int{4, 4}) // (start, end, shape)

	// In fact Nune can create tensors from (almost) anything.
	_ = tensor.From[int](5)
	_ = tensor.From[float32]([]int{1, 2, 3}) // implicitly casts the type
	_ = tensor.From[float64]("nune") // even strings

	type Point int
	_ = tensor.From[Point](3) // or custom types

	// It can also take any n-dimensional array/slice.
	// The tensor will implicitly have a shape of (2, 2).
	_ = tensor.From[byte]([][]uint{{1, 2}, {3, 4}})
}

Or performing parallel operations with multithreaded math:

package main

import (
	"math"
	"github.com/lordlarker/nune/tensor"
)

func main() {
	t := tensor.Range[float64](-100, 100, 1).Reshape(2, 4, 25)
	
	// Built in methods of various kinds
	_ = t.Abs()
	_ = t.Sum()
	_ = t.Add(t.Copy())
	
	_ = t.Sqrt().Floor()

	_, _, _ = t.Min(), t.Max(), t.Mean()
	_, _, _ = t.Sin(), t.Cos(), t.Tan()
	
	// Or make your own, and automatically
	// get parallelization on the way
	_ = t.PwiseOp(func(x float64) float64 {
		return 1 / (1 + math.Exp(-x)) // parallel sigmoid function
	})
}

And what’s better than some fancy terminal output:

package main

import (
	"fmt"
	"github.com/lordlarker/nune"
	"github.com/lordlarker/nune/tensor"
)

func main() {
	scalar := tensor.From[int](5)
	fmt.Println(scalar)
	// Prints:
	// 
	// Tensor(5)

	nune.FmtConfig.Precision = 2 // number of decimal points
	t := tensor.Range[float32](-5, 5, 1).Reshape(2, 5)
	fmt.Println(t)
	// Prints:
	//
	// Tensor([[-5.00, -4.00, -3.00, -2.00, -1.00]
	//         [ 0.00,  1.00,  2.00,  3.00,  4.00]])

	nune.FmtConfig.Excerpt = 4 // number of elements shown per axis
	t = tensor.Range[float32](0, 256, 1).Reshape(16, 16)
	fmt.Println(t)
	// Prints:
	//
	//  Tensor([[  0.00,   1.00, ...,  14.00,  15.00]
        //          [ 16.00,  17.00, ...,  30.00,  31.00]
        //          ...,
        //          [224.00, 225.00, ..., 238.00, 239.00]
        //          [240.00, 241.00, ..., 254.00, 255.00]])
	
	nune.FmtConfig.Btoa = true // bytes to ASCII
	b := tensor.From[byte]("nune")
	fmt.Println(b)
	// Prints:
	//
	// Tensor([n, u, n, e])
}

Roadmap

Since Nune will always be designed to provide only the minimal foundational numerical computing facilities, the roadmap isn’t that long, and Nune already is close to stabilizing.
Things that still need work before this is a rock-stable library are the following, in order:

  • Create a backend to handle all the tensor manipulation routines and managing layout and memory.
  • Optimize the API for maximum performance.
  • Rigorously test the API.
  • Stabilize the API.
  • Write examples to ease the use of this library.

License

Nune has a BSD-style license, as found in the LICENSE file.

GitHub

View Github