tor-controller

This project started as an exercise to update kragniz‘s https://github.com/kragniz/tor-controller version

Important!! This project is not backward compatible with kragniz’s OnionService definitions. You will need to update your OnionService manifests

Changes

  • Go updated to 1.17
  • Code ported to kubebuilder version 3
  • Domain updated moved from tor.k8s.io (protected) to k8s.torproject.org (see https://github.com/kubernetes/enhancements/pull/1111)
  • Added OnionBalancedService type
  • New OnionService version v1alpha2
  • Migrate clientset code to controller-runtime

Roadmap / TODO list

  • Implement OnionBalancedService resource (HA Onion Services)
  • Metrics exporters
  • TOR daemon management via socket (e.g: config reload)

TOR

Tor is an anonymity network that provides:

  • privacy
  • enhanced tamperproofing
  • freedom from network surveillance
  • NAT traversal

tor-controller allows you to create OnionService resources in kubernetes.
These services are used similarly to standard kubernetes services, but they
only serve traffic on the tor network (available on .onion addresses).

See this page for
more information about onion services.

tor-controller creates the following resources for each OnionService:

  • a service, which is used to send traffic to application pods
  • tor pod, which contains a tor daemon to serve incoming traffic from the tor
    network, and a management process that watches the kubernetes API and
    generates tor config, signaling the tor daemon when it changes
  • rbac rules

Install

Install tor-controller:

$ kubectl apply -f hack/install.yaml

Quickstart with random address

Create some deployment to test against, in this example we’ll deploy an echoserver. You can find the definition at hack/sample/echoserver.yaml:

Apply it:

$ kubectl apply -f hack/sample/echoserver.yaml

For a fixed address, we need a private key. This should be kept safe, since
someone can impersonate your onion service if it is leaked. Tor-Controller will generate an Onion v3 key-pair for you (stored as a secret), unless it already exists

Create an onion service, hack/sample/onionservice.yaml, referencing an existing private key is optional:

apiVersion: tor.k8s.torproject.org/v1alpha2
kind: OnionService
metadata:
  name: example-onion-service
spec:
  version: 3
  rules:
    - port:
        number: 80
      backend:
        service:
          name: http-app
          port:
            number: 8080

Apply it:

$ kubectl apply -f hack/sample/onionservice.yaml

List active OnionServices:

$ kubectl get onionservices
NAME                    HOSTNAME                                                         TARGETCLUSTERIP   AGE
example-onion-service   cfoj4552cvq7fbge6k22qmkun3jl37oz273hndr7ktvoahnqg5kdnzqd.onion   10.43.252.41      1m

This service should now be accessable from any tor client,
for example Tor Browser:

Random service names

If spec.privateKeySecret is not specified, tor-controller will start a service with a random name. The key-pair is stored in the same namespace as the tor-daemon, with the name ONIONSERVICENAME-tor-secret

Onion service versions

The spec.version field specifies which onion protocol to use.
Only v3 is supported.

tor-controller defaults to using v3 if spec.version is not specified.

Using with nginx-ingress

tor-controller on its own simply directs TCP traffic to a backend service.
If you want to serve HTTP stuff, you’ll probably want to pair it with
nginx-ingress or some other ingress controller.

To do this, first install nginx-ingress normally. Then point an onion service
at the nginx-ingress-controller, for example:

apiVersion: tor.k8s.torproject.org/v1alpha2
kind: OnionService
metadata:
  name: example-onion-service
spec:
  version: 3
  rules:
    - port:
        number: 80
      backend:
        service:
          name: http-app
          port:
            number: 8080
  privateKeySecret:
    name: nginx-onion-key
    key: private_key

This can then be used in the same way any other ingress is. You can find a full
example, with a default backend at hack/sample/full-example.yaml

Other projects

References:

GitHub

View Github